Friday, July 30, 2010

Babysitter's Boot Camp: July 28-29, 2010


Link for our chapter Babysitters Boot Camp INFO
Be the Best Babysitter on the Block!
An expanded version of our Babysitter’s Training
course, the Babysitter Boot Camp is a 2-day
event designed to provide you with the
knowledge, skills and confidence necessary to be
the best babysitter on the block!
Through hands-on activities and lively
discussions, this training camp will teach you
how to care for infants and children, make good
decisions and solve problems, respond to
emergencies, be a good leader and role model,
interview for jobs, and much more!
Each student received a:
· Babysitter Certification w/Books & CD-ROM
· First Aid Certification w/Book
· Infant & Child CPR Certification w/Book
· Dog FA/CPR Certification w/Book & DVD
· Babysitter First Aid Kit
· Babysitter T-Shirt

Saturday, July 24, 2010

DAT volunteers respond to aid early morning house fire residents: July 24, 2010


Photo Credit: Donna Martinez/American Red Cross
July 24, 2010(Colorado Springs) by PPARC DPAT volunteer Donna Martinez
A early morning single family house fire, displaces four residents on July 24, 2010. Your local chapter of the American Red Cross responded with two volunteers to assist the residents with their immediate needs.
This is made possible by generous donations from the community.

One of two cats was retrieved from the residence safely after the fire was out.

More images from this fire are available to view here:
PPARC FLICKR PHOTOSTREAM

About the American Red Cross: The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation's blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit http://www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

Friday, July 16, 2010

Holiday Mail for Heros!

When you are searching for something productive to do during the hot week coming up....and need to keep all those kiddos busy, why not start on your christmas cards!

Holiday Mail for Heros

You won't have to worry about it later when time is limited! Get in the spirit!

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Third Annual National Pet Fire Safety Day

NEWS POST FROM REDCROSS.ORG
Thursday, July 15, 2010 — Home fires are the most common disaster that the American Red Cross responds to and also the most preventable. According to the United States Fire Administration, an estimated 500,000 pets are affected annually by fires. Today marks the third annual National Pet Fire Safety Day, and there are several ways to help your pet stay safe.

Photo of "Buster" courtesy of Mary Klapmust
The best way for to protect pets from the effects of a fire is to include them in your family plan. In the event of a disaster, if you must evacuate, the most important thing you can do to protect your pets is to evacuate them, too.

Take Your Pets to a Safe Place:

Local and state health and safety regulations do not permit the Red Cross to allow pets in disaster shelters. Service animals which assist people with disabilities are the only animals allowed in Red Cross shelters. It may be difficult, if not impossible, to find shelter for your animals in the midst of an evacuation, so plan ahead. Do not wait until disaster strikes!
Contact hotels and motels outside your local area to check their policies on accepting pets and restrictions on number, size and species. Ask if "no pet" policies could be waived in an emergency. Keep a list of "pet friendly" places, including phone numbers, with your other disaster information and supplies. If you are alerted to an impending disaster, call ahead for reservations.
Ask friends, relatives or others outside the affected area whether they could shelter your animals. If you have more than one pet, they may be more comfortable if kept together, but be prepared to house them separately.
Make a list of boarding facilities and veterinarians who could shelter animals in an emergency; include 24-hour phone numbers.
Ask local animal shelters if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets during a disaster. Animal shelters may be overwhelmed caring for the animals they already have as well as those displaced by a disaster, so this should be your last resort.

Be Red Cross Ready Safety Series Vol. 2: Dog First Aid
Assemble a Portable Pet Disaster Supplies Kit:
Shop the Redcross Store for all your pet first aid manualsWhether you are away from home for a day or a week, you'll need essential supplies. Keep items in an accessible place and store them in sturdy containers that can be carried easily (a duffle bag or covered trash containers, for example). Your pet disaster supplies kit should include:
Medications and medical records (stored in a waterproof container) and a first aid kit.
Sturdy leashes, harnesses, and/or carriers to transport pets safely and ensure that your animals can't escape.
Current photos of your pets in case they get lost.
Food, potable water, bowls, cat litter/pan, and can opener.
Information on feeding schedules, medical conditions, behavior problems, and the name and number of your veterinarian in case you have to foster or board your pets.
Pet bed or toys if easily transportable.
The ASPCA recommends using a rescue sticker alert to let people know that pets are inside your home. Make sure it is visible to rescue workers, and that it includes 1) the types and number of pets in your household; 2) the name of your veterinarian; and 3) your veterinarian's phone number. If you must evacuate with your pets, and if time allows, write "EVACUATED" across the stickers.

Prevent Your Pet from Starting Fires:

The National Fire Protection Association estimates that nearly 1,000 house fires each year are accidentally started by the homeowners' pets.

The American Kennel Club and ADT Security Services have joined forces to provide the following tips.
Extinguish open flames - Pets are generally curious and will investigate cooking appliances, candles, or even a fire in your fireplace. Ensure your pet is not left unattended around an open flame and make sure to thoroughly extinguish any open flame before leaving your home.
Remove stove knobs - Be sure to remove stove knobs or protect them with covers before leaving the house - a stove or cook top is the number one piece of equipment involved in your pet starting a fire.
Invest in flameless candles. These candles contain a light bulb rather than an open flame, and take the danger out of your pet knocking over a candle. Cats are notorious for starting fires when their tails turn over lit candles.
Keep pets near entrances when away from home. Keep collars on pets and leashes at the ready in case firefighters need to rescue your pet. When leaving pets home alone, keep them in areas or rooms near entrances where firefighters can easily find them.
Secure young pets; keep them confined away from potential fire-starting hazards when you are away from home such as in crates or behind baby gates in secure areas.
Affix a pet alert window cling and write down the number of pets inside your house and attach the static cling to a front window. This critical information saves rescuers time when locating your pets. Make sure to keep the number of pets listed on them updated.
Visit RedCross.org for additional fire prevention and pet safety guidance.


About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation's blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Puppy Paramedic

Would you know how to save a life? This puppy does!


Link to site

Saturday, July 3, 2010

PPARC helps family at house fire at 127 W Mills Street

Your dedicated PPARC DAT (Disaster Action Team) volunteers responded to assist the family at 127 W Mills Street when their attic caught on fire late July 2, 2010.
The volunteers help comfort and support the family with their immediate disaster related needs at the time of a fire crisis.
Would you like to volunteer? The American Red Cross Chapters are only able to do what they do because of volunteers and by the generous donations by the community and public! To learn more...visit our website Pikes Peak Chapter of the American Red Cross to get more information on donating your time to help others in our Colorado Springs community.

Enjoy your Fourth of July Weekend Safely


Get your disaster supplies kit from the Red Cross store

Reposted from www.redcross.org NEWS
Thursday, July 01, 2010 — Many of us will enjoy a three-day weekend this year with Independence Day falling on a Sunday. As you plan your Fourth of July, you might be thinking of travel, fireworks or a yummy barbecue. The American Red Cross would like everyone to enjoy a safe summer holiday, and offers some tips to help you and your loved ones have a great weekend.



Get your disaster supplies kit from the Red Cross store.Travel Tips
With more people on the roads during the holiday, it’s more important than ever to drive safely—which means being well rested and alert, buckling up, observing speed limits and following the rules of the road. If you plan on drinking, designate a driver who won’t drink.

In addition:

Don’t let your vehicle’s gas tank get too low. If you have car trouble, pull as far as possible off the highway.
Carry a Disaster Supplies Kit in your trunk.
Pay attention to the weather forecast for your destination. Travel and weather Web sites can help you avoid storms and other regional challenges that could impact your safety.
Let someone know your destination, your route and when you expect to arrive. If your car gets stuck along the way, help can be sent along your predetermined route.
Find out what disasters may occur where you are traveling, especially if they are disasters you have never experienced. Find out how you would get information in the event of a disaster (local radio systems, emergency alert systems).
If you are traveling with your pet, redcross.org has special advice to make your trip more enjoyable.

Grilling
Even if you consider yourself a lean, mean, grilling machine, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do it safely.
First, always supervise a barbecue grill when in use. Nobody likes a burned burger (or a burned anything else).

Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited. And keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck, tree branches, or anything that could catch fire. That means you should not be grilling in your house, camper, tent or any enclosed area.

While you’re mastering the art of the perfectly-cooked steak, make sure everyone else, including the pets, stays away from the grill. Finally, keep yourself safe by using the long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill.

Fireworks
Spectacular fireworks are often a highlight of the Fourth. You can enjoy the show safely by following a few tips:

Store fireworks in a cool, dry place away from children and pets.
Never give fireworks to small children, and always follow the instructions on the packaging.
Keep a supply of water close by as a precaution.
Make sure the person lighting fireworks always wears eye protection.
Light only one firework at a time and never attempt to relight a “dud."
Never throw or point a firework toward people, animals, vehicles, structures or flammable materials.
In addition, stay at least 500 feet away from professional fireworks displays, and leave any area immediately where untrained amateurs are using fireworks.

The American Red Cross wishes everyone a safe and happy Fourth of July. For more safety and preparedness tips, visit www.redcross.org.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation's blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.